Excel Charts are great but there are so many to choose from that sometimes its hard to decide which one goes well with your data.

The Infographic below (scroll down) helps you decide which Excel chart to use based on the data that you have and message that you want to convey.

EXCEL COLUMN CHART: Use this Chart if you have less than 12 data points & want to show trends.

E.g. Monthly or Annual data points Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

EXCEL LINE CHART: Use this Chart if you have more than 12 data points & want to show trends .

E.g. Historic results or Statistical data Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

EXCEL PIE CHARTS: Use this Chart for component comparisons only (Sums to 100%)

E.g. Market share Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

EXCEL BAR CHARTS: Use this Chart if you have long names and want to compare

E.g. Competitor analysis Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

EXCEL SCATTER CHART: Use this Chart if you have 2 variables and want to show a relationship.

E.g. GDP v Income or Speed Limit v Accidents Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

EXCEL BUBBLE CHART: Use this Chart if you have 3 variables and want to show a relationship.

E.g. GDP v Income V Population (Size of bubble is the 3rd variable)  Click Here To Get Our Free Excel Chart Templates

*** Click on the image to enlarge or right click on the image to save image/target to your desktop ***

Excel Chart Template

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